Outdoor Appliance Safety And Side Effects

The dangers of carbon monoxide are everywhere and while some of us are more aware, other people still do not understand where the dangers can come from, as can be see in the article below. For further help click here.

A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater.

The incident has prompted health officials to warn against using outdoor appliances in enclosed areas.

Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death.
A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image)
A Perth woman has suffered serious carbon monoxide poisoning after using a charcoal barbecue as a heater inside her home (stock image)
Western Australia’s chief health officer Tarun Weeramanthri (pictured) said burning fuels or using unflued heaters in non-ventilated areas can cause poisoning, which can lead to serious tissue damage and death.

‘Somebody who is intoxicated or sleeping can die from carbon monoxide poisoning without ever experiencing symptoms,’ Professor Weeramanthri said, according to Perth Now.

‘Anybody who believes they might be experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning should go outside immediately and not return inside until they have recovered completely.

‘Once in the fresh air, recovery is usually fast so if this does not happen it is important to call Health Direct on 1800 022 222 or the Poisons Information Centre on 13 11 26.
CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING CASE STUDIES

In January 2011, a Queensland man died from suspected carbon monoxide poisoning caused by generator fumes while taking shelter from cyclone Yasi.

In 2009, a 43-year-old Sydney man died from carbon monoxide poisoning after using an outdoor charcoal barbeque inside his home.

During 2006-07, there were 365 public hospital cases for carbon monoxide poisonings recorded in Australia.

In the US around 30 deaths and 450 injuries each year are related to accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Source: ACCC

The odourless, colourless and highly poisonous gas is produced by any fuel-burning appliance. Early symptoms include dizziness, nausea and confusion.

Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause heart disease and brain damage and is often deadly.

Read the full article at the Daily Mail

An interesting new development in further potential side effects of carbon monoxide poisoning. This time with a link to dementia as can be seen in the following article.

A CHARITY said an ‘urgent investigation’ is needed to see if there is a between carbon monoxide poisoning could cause dementia in a bid help protect the elderly and vulnerable people.

Carbon monoxide could be linked to dementia

Carbon monoxide is a colourless, odourless gas that can be toxic to humans and in large concentrations it is known to be a ‘stealth killer’.

The Gas Safety Trust has discussed carbon monoxide as being one of factors which could be affecting peoples’ cognitive function.

A study, published in the Emergency Medicine Journal has found 30 per cent of patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning may experience the ’onset of neuropsychiatric symptoms’, including dementia.

It is also naturally produced within the body in small quantities, where it plays a number of important roles such as helping to regulate blood pressure.
Carbon monoxide is colourless and odourless

In the brain, carbon monoxide acts as a ‘chemical messenger’, helping nerve cells to communicate with each other.

Previous research has shown that people with Alzheimer’s have increased amounts of carbon monoxide in the brain, but it’s unclear whether this increase is a cause of damage or a result of disease processes.

But researchers from the University of Leeds have found that carbon monoxide found naturally in our bodies could help protect against damage from Alzheimer’s proteins.

Although fatal to people in large quantities, the study shows that the small amount of the gas present in our bodies may protect against the effects of the amyloid protein, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease.
Symptoms of dementia include memory impairment

The research, first published in 2014, was funded by Alzheimer’s Research UK and Alzheimer’s Society with support from The Henry Smith Charity, and was published in the journal Cell Death and Disease.

The NIHR Clinical Research Network: West Midlands and the Gas Safety Trust held a roundtable discussion in Birmingham on May 25, to consider carbon monoxide poisoning and the elderly and potential areas for research funding.

The meeting looked in particular at carbon monoxide in relation to the impact on peoples’ cognitive function as well as potential links to dementia.

Chaired by Dr Susan Bews, an independent Gas Safety Trust trustee, the event brought together local clinicians and researchers who have ideas for research in the area.

Symptoms of dementia and CO poisoning are similar

Dr Susan Bews, Gas Safety Trust said: “It is clear that there is a lot that we still do not understand about a possible link between carbon monoxide poisoning and dementia.

“We had a lively and stimulating debate which the Gas Safety Trust hopes will lead to concrete, valuable and feasible research proposals.

“Elderly people represent one of the most vulnerable and at risk sections of society.

“With Public Health England projections suggesting that over one million people will have a diagnosis of dementia by 2025, it is clear that this discussion is both timely and urgently needed.

“It was very encouraging to hear the enthusiasm for further research into understanding the risks of low level carbon monoxide for the elderly and particularly the real commitment across a wide range of professionals to work together to reduce the risks for the more vulnerable, for example those with dementia.”

Read more of original publish at express.co.uk

Two great articles once again emphasising how dangerous carbon monoxide is to us and why it is imperative to stay aware and ensure the proper measurements are taken to protect our selves against co poisoning. Learn more about gas safety from here.

Source: carbon monoxide

The original article is found at this site

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