Carbon Monoxide Threat After Hailstorm

In Colorado Springs, roofers working to repair roofs damaged in last Thursday’s hail storm are noticing a potentially deadly kind of damage, according to KOAA 5.

carbon monoxide detector

It is important to maintain working carbon monoxide detectors in the home to warn you of the presence of high levels of this potentially deadly gas. (Flickr / Creative Commons / Judy van der Velden)

The large balls of hail not only damaged shingles, siding, windows, and patio furniture, but also damaged ventilation caps on chimneys.

Total Roofing CEO Scott McIntyre told KOAA 5 that this could “seriously kill somebody.” He said that the Type B vents are at particular risk of causing carbon monoxide poisoning. B vents are found in chimneys and ventilate gas burning appliances.

Thursday’s hail dislodged the caps on the ventilation pipes, causing them to collapse and blocking the opening of the pipe. If this is blocked, this could cause the pipe not to exhaust the toxic carbon monoxide gases that the appliances release. The gas is odorless, tasteless, and colorless, so one may not notice until they are already sick.

It is important to have a working carbon monoxide detector set up in the home. Colorado law requires that homeowners and owners of rental properties install a carbon monoxide alarm near bedrooms in every home that is heated with fossil fuel, has a fuel-fired appliance, has a fireplace, or has an attached garage.

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache, nausea, dizziness, loss of coordination, vomiting, and loss of consciousness. If you are experiencing these symptoms, get help immediately. Being exposed to carbon monoxide for too long can be deadly.

McIntyre told KOAA 5 that four out of four of the homes they looked at on Monday with Type B vents had this problem where the opening was blocked. McIntyre said this was something they had not seen before, but it is a “potentially deadly situation.”

If you were in the path of the hailstorm and have a Type B vent, it is important that you call a specialist in heating and air conditioning to come look at the vent, McIntyre said. Colorado Springs Utilities spokesperson Natilia Sibert agreed.

Source: Carbon Monoxide Threat After Hailstorm Carbon Monoxide Threat After Hailstorm

The original article is available for viewing at this website

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